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Submission Preparation Checklist

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.
  • Manuscript is written in English using the Submission Template and adhering to the stylistic and bibliographic requirements as outlined in the Author Guidelines. 

  • Submitted manuscripts should be original and not published before, nor submitted anywhere else at the same time. 

  • Authors are required to complete the metadata information (email address, affiliation, etc) during the submission.

  • All authors have contributed to and read the manuscript, and agree to publish it. Once published, authors have agreed to provide retractions or corrections of mistakes, in case of detection.

Author Guidelines

Submission Template

Submitted manuscripts should be original and not published before, nor submitted anywhere else at the same time. Manuscripts should be written in English. We encourage authors to utilize language software before submission.

Authors should upload the manuscript in MS Word (.doc or .docx) containing the text followed by tables and high-resolution figures. The manuscript should apply the line number to aid the review process (see Submission Template).

The structure of research articles should be as follows:

  1. TITLE
  2. Author(s) full name
  3. Author(s) full address
  4. Correspondence author: E-mail
  5. ABSTRACT
  6. Keywords
  7. INTRODUCTION
  8. MATERIALS AND METHODS
  9. RESULTS
  10. DISCUSSION
  11. CONCLUSION
  12. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT (optional)
  13. REFERENCES
  14. Tables and Figures 

TITLE. Should demonstrate the main idea of a manuscript and be as concise as possible. The title should be in capitals, bold letters, and centered. Species names in the title should be in italics and capitals.

Author's Information. Author's full name (no abbreviations) including the name of the institution with city and country, and an email address. When a manuscript is written by several authors from different institutions, then superscript numerals are used to refer the authors, and also the corresponding author should be identified.

ABSTRACT. Abstract to be a concise (max. 250 words) and complete report of the work that can stand alone without further explanation. It should include: the objectives/hypothesis of the study and justification for conducting the investigation, the material and methods used, the main results obtained and significant conclusions that can be drawn. The abstract should not include an extended discussion of your results, references, tabulated data and any abbreviations unless they are widely understood (e.g., DNA, pH, USA).

Keywords consisting of 3 to 5 words should be listed in order of importance. These may be composites (e.g. 'coastal management, 'population dynamics'), but they should not be phrases or sentences. Keywords are the most pertinent informative words pertaining to the research.

INTRODUCTION. Composed of the background of the research and mentioning previous studies that had been done. State question(s) or hypotheses that are needed to be answered through your work.

MATERIALS AND METHODS. Methodology creates the context for evaluating the data, presenting how samples and measurements, are collected, what controls are used, what variables are and are not considered, which assumptions are made; all these things play an important role in the interpretation of the results. If a well-known method was applied, there should be a reference to the paper in which it is described. When a well-known method is modified, there should be a clear mention of which part was modified.

RESULTS. State the obtained results based on the given methods. The same data may not be presented in both table and graph format. References are not normally given in the Results section. Whenever possible, all data should be displayed as tables or graph.

DISCUSSION. Discuss the results/data by comparing the currently reported data with the previous results. Highlight the similarities, as well as the differences, and the uniqueness of the current finding. Explain why the result(s) are significant. End the discussion with a conclusion and an indication of possible future research. End the discussion by giving a conclusion and an indication of possible future research in that particular topic.

CONCLUSION. The conclusion of a research paper needs to summarize the content and purpose of the paper. It should briefly restate the topic as well as explaining why it is important; rephrase the thesis statement; and briefly, summarize the main points. If and when needed, the author can state to the readers that there is a need for further research on the paper's topic.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT. Information on financial support should be provided. Authors may thank people who have helped with the manuscript.

REFERENCES. Marine Research in Indonesia (MRI) has a reference template in popular reference management software products, such as Mendeley and EndNote. If you use a reference management software, please ensure that you remove all field codes before submitting the electronic manuscript.

Mendeley. Users of Mendeley Desktop can install the reference style for MRI via DOWNLOAD MENDELEY. You may open Mendeley Desktop, then choose view > citation style > more style. Then, new "Citation Style" windows will appear. Choose "Get More Styles" and fill the link into download style and simply click Download.

Endnote. EndNote users may download MRI reference style by the following this DOWNLOAD ENDNOTE.

If you are not referencing management software users, please follow the format of the sample references and citations as shown in this Guide. References should be in the APA-like style (please refer to the example of the exception). They should be listed at the end of the paper and arranged in alphabetical order (first author's surname).

Papers from books, conference reports, symposium proceedings, etc.: Give the title of the cited article, the editor(s) and title of the volume, the publisher and place of the publisher (not the location where the conference was held), and the pages of the article. The date of the citation must be the year of publication (not the year in which the conference was held).

Dissertations: Write the title in lower case, 'MS/Ph.D. thesis/dissertation' (no spaces or periods in 'MS' or 'Ph.D.'), and give the university and its location.

Journal names should be abbreviated using ISO4 (Information and documentation – Rules for the abbreviation of title words and titles of publications) from  International Organization for Standardization. Please refer to this site as guidance: ISO4 abbreviation.

Digital Object Identifier (DOI), if available, should be added in the last part.

Example of the References section:

  • Wahyudi, A. J., Wada, S., Aoki, M. and Hama, T. (2015). Gaetice depressus (Crustacea, Varunidae): Species profile and its role in organic carbon and nitrogen flow. Ocean Sci., 50(2), 389-401. doi:10.1007/s12601-015-0036-y.
  • Assis, C. (1996). A generalized index for stomach contents analyses in fish. Sci. Mar., 60, 385-389.
  • Eve, T. M. (2001). Chemistry and chemical ecology of Indo-Pacific gorgonians. Ph.D. dissertation, University of California, San Diego, CA., (pp. 125).
  • Miyake, S. (1983). Japanese Crustacean Decapods and Stomatopods in Color Vol. II-Brachyura (Crabs). Tokyo: Hoikusha Publishing Co. Ltd., (pp. 277).
  • Raffaelli, D. and Hawkins, S. (1996). Intertidal Ecology. London: Chapman and Hall, (pp. 356).
  • Serene, R. and Moosa, M. K. (1971). New and few known species of Brachyura from Ambon. Mar. Res. Indonesia, 11, 3-16.
  • Waterman, T. H. (1961). Comparative physiology. In T. H. Waterman (ed), The physiology of Crustacea; II. Sense organs integration and behavior. New York: Academic Press, (pp. 521-593).

Citation in text figures is cited as Figure 19; references as Suriaatmadja (1956), (Suriaatmadja, 1956), (Suriaatmadja, 1956; 1959), (Wyrtky and Suriaatmadja, 1956), (Suriaatmadja et al., 1956), (Suriaatmadja, 1956; Wyrtky, 1960).

TABLES. Table(s) should be grouped at the end of the text, but the approximate position should be indicated in the text. Titles should be given for all tables that should be numbered in Arabic numerals. Table titles are written in Time New Roman 12 point font.

FIGURES. Figure(s) should be grouped at the end of the text. 

PHOTOS. Photo(s) should be in JPEG with at least a 300 x 300 resolution. Add measurement scale if needed.

UNITS AND NUMBERS. Authors are required to use the International System of Units. A number less than 10 and any number forming the first word of a sentence should be spelled out. The year should be completely written.

TAXONOMIC PAPERS should follow the adopted International Codes of Nomenclature. Description of species should be in a telegraphic style. Family and Order of the groups in a discussion should be indicated in parentheses.

 

Prospectus and Conflict of Interest Reviewers

We encourage the author to suggest at least two prospectus reviewers to the editor, as well as disclose any potential conflict of interest. This would help us for an effective peer review process.

 

Proofreading and Printing

The finalized manuscript has a two-column style (see Publication Template). Galley proofs will be sent to author(s) for approval and the corrected proofs should be returned to the editors within one week. Once finalized, pdf file of the manuscript will be available online.

 

   

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